Marketing Reviews

Marketing List Part 1 – Free Distribution

I decided to start posting about some of the free or low-cost marketing opportunities that I am familiar with. This is Marketing List Part 1, where I expect to have around 25 posts on the series by the time I am done. Each post will have 5-10 sites. I am actually going to each site and verifying things, so as of the posting date of each marketing listing, the sites were active. SAMPLE: Site/Group Name: Read…

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Blog Fictorians Marketing

Expanding Your Amazon Reach

Amazon’s AuthorCentral websites allow readers to see a dedicated page focusing on a particular writer. It’s an easy way for Amazon customers, particularly those with Kindle readers, to find more about an author. The recently re-designed pages now include a sliding window featuring books registered to an author. The images are larger, allowing the viewer to see more details and entice them to purchase another book from an author they enjoyed. Most of the professional writers…

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Industry News On Writing The Passive Voice

Daily E-Book Deals Are Gaining Traction

From: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ThePassiveVoice/~3/n6bYMqYfipo/

From The Wall Street Journal:

Every day, the company BookBub.com sends out more than 7 million emails pointing consumers to e-books that cost as little as 99 cents each and free titles as well.

A host of big and independent publishers list titles there, including New York-based Kensington Publishing Corp. The idea is to entice readers with a bargain, so they get hooked on a new author or series and eventually buy full-priced works.

Kensington’s chief executive, Steven Zacharius, says BookBub is powering sales growth for the company, but he worries about the long-term value of his catalog if he nurtures a generation that won’t pay more than a few dollars for an e-book.

“We know we might be shooting ourselves in the foot,” says Mr. Zacharius. “But I can’t resist because it’s such a good way to stimulate sales.” Every promotion the company has run through BookBub has been profitable, he said, despite the steep discounts.

. . . .

“There are more of these promotion companies, and because their reach has expanded, their effectiveness has increased,” said Liz Perl, chief marketing officer at CBS Corp.’s Simon & Schuster. Many new e-books from major publishers are priced from $12.99 to $14.99.

For publishers, the promotions are a form of advertising in an industry that traditionally has spent cautiously. There is hope the services could help jump-start stagnant e-book sales. A survey of 1,200-plus publishers by the Association of American Publishers found e-book revenue for consumer titles fell 11% this year through August to $964 million.

. . . .

The risk for publishers is that consumers could become accustomed to paying lower prices and only purchase titles when they are on sale.

“It’s an industrywide concern,” said Heather Fain, director of marketing strategy at the Hachette Book Group. It’s hard to know, she added, whether readers who are dedicated to reading bargain books will ever spend as enthusiastically to buy full-priced titles.

. . . .

Offering cheap prices via BookBub and its rivals is seen as a way to pull consumers away from Facebook and other digital temptations. On Dec. 17, for example, independent publisher Sourcebooks Inc. used BookBub to promote Scott Wilbanks’ novel “The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster” for 99 cents instead of its regular $14.99 price.

“We want people to discover this book and start talking about it,” said Dominique Raccah,chief executive of Sourcebooks. “When that happens you get a viral marketing effect.”

. . . .

BookBub expects to spark the sale of 20 million e-books at its retail partners this year, generating about $30 million in retail sales. Chief Executive Josh Schanker said heavily discounted e-books don’t compromise overall sales for publishers because they target a segment of consumers who otherwise wouldn’t buy those particular discounted books at full price.

“What publishers are saying is that they’d rather you read our book than play Angry Birds,” said Mr. Schanker. “It’s a cluttered landscape with more and more titles. Price promotions give publishers the ability to get a large group of people to sample their books.”

Link to the rest at The Wall Street Journal (Link may expire) and thanks to Nirmala for the tip.

PG says that a career hawking books to Barnes & Noble doesn’t prepare a publishing executive to have a clue about consumer marketing and retail pricing.

It shows.

Over and over.

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author website tips & tricks Blog Marketing

Fake Twitter Accounts

One of the things authors do is to blindly accept every Twitter follower that falls within their gravitational well. After all, it does look like you have a huge following when someone visits your Twitter profile. Unfortunately, people can see what percentage of your followers and folks you follow are made up of bogus accounts. This is not an accurate count, since most of the services that dig through your lists count things like no…

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author website tips & tricks

Adding a Favicon to Your Website

What’s a Favicon? A favicon is a special 16×16 pixel image that is used by web browsers to display a unique image in each tab. If, like me, you tend to have over 30 tabs open at a time, the favicon is the item displayed so you know what you have open in each and every tab. Amazon, Google, Facebook, Twitter, and even tiny WordPress sites have the ability to use a unique image. Where…

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Blog On Writing

Print is Dead?

I’ve read several articles about how digital sales will eliminate dead-tree (print) format. Most of my author pals sell more digital downloads than print. I’m the exception, apparently. My print sales to digital sales are 4:1, where I will sell four print books for every digital download. Some months it goes much higher, such as my record ratio of 28:1 in March 2014 — with a measly 8 digital sales. Not all of my titles have…

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Blog On Writing

5 Lies Self Published Authors Tell

  1. I’m selling X books This is probably the biggest lie that self-published authors tell. Everyone wants to be successful, and the more successful an author is, the more they sell. It’s almost a self-fulfilling prophesy. Average readers want to read something that everyone else likes — think Harry Potter or Twilight. I’ve seen quite a few authors crowing over how many books they are selling. The unfortunate thing is anyone can see the…

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Conventions Events

Denver Comic Con

Coming up at the end of May 2013, the Denver Comic Con is the largest convention in the Denver region. This year, they’re expecting 50,000 attendees. I will be attending this year, along with Peter J. Wacks, to promote our Bram Stoker Award® nominated graphic novel, Behind These Eyes. We’ll be nea Kevin J. Anderson and Rebecca Moesta, right by the front of the dealers room.  If you’re going, please make sure you stop by…

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Blog Reviews

Amazon’s Shelfari

Just for fun, I decided to pop over to Shelfari to see what they have to offer. One of the best things Shelfari has is the ability to import from your Amazon purchasing history. I was rather shocked to see that I picked up 620 books in the last three years. True, most were freebies for my Kindle, but included in the list were 245 books that I actually purchased. I ended up adding a…

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Blog On Writing

Sailing the Digital Seas: Researching Publishers

  Recently, the blogosphere was all atwitter concerning the story of Mandy DeGeit, a new author who discovered the story she submitted to an anthology wasn’t the same as the story that was published under her name. Heavyweights like Neil Gaiman and Jonathan Maberry waded in to give their take on the carnage. Authors who have been around the block a time or two have watched these publishers come and go, watching the cycle repeat…

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